35 Buddhas of Confession | Buddha and Boddhisattvas | Ritual Thanka
Code: 51353

35 Buddhas of Confession

Size / Weight: 35 x 24 inches / 300 gms
Material: Pure 24 Carat Gold,Gouache and acrylic colors on Cotton Canvas
Brocade:

Total:
$9000.00

  • May 20

  • May 22 - May 24

  • May 26 - May 28

Description

 
Original hand-painted 35 Buddhas Thangka for confession | Nagarjuna Tradition | Triskhandha-Sutra | Eri Style Paiting | Artist Chhewang |

We would like to offer free brocade for this thangka.

Code: 51353

Size:24 x 35 inches, 61 x 90 cms

Material: Pure 24 Carat Gold, Gouache, and acrylic colors on Cotton Canvas

Thirty-five Buddhas of Confession (Tib. Tung-sha) is practiced based upon a Mahayana text known as the 'Sutra of Three Heaps' (Skt. Triskandha-sutra), which is performed by the Buddhist sangha in order to purify any transgressions against their religious vows. This three-part practice involves: praises to the Buddhas, confession, and dedication of merit. There are several different traditions of depicting the Thirty-five Buddhas, with their varying colours, gestures, and their few individual hand attributes.

This "35 Buddhas of Confession" thangka follows the tradition of Arya Nagarjuna one of the greatest maha shiddhas that ever lived. All the iconography details, emblems, colors, and attributes were painted as mentioned in the text. For any practitioner who is looking for 35 Buddhas thangka, this thangka painting will be perfect for your practice.

The original size of the painting is 24 inches in width x 35 inches in height.

This exquisite painting of 35 Buddhas of Confession was completed by contemporary Eri style Painter Chhewang Lama in early October 2019. (Note Eri Style developed from the Ü and Tsang Provinces of Tibet since the early 19th century.)

Mr. Lama was born in the spring of ox wood year 1985 in a remote village of Kavre Palanchowk. He started painting thangkas from an early age when he was just a teenager. He learnt the basics and advance skills from his mentor Master artist Mr.Man Bdr.Lama. Chhewang an ardent apprentice trained under his master for over 20 years. He has also used his skills to paint the murals of a monastery located at Namo Buddha – one of the holiest Buddhist pilgrimage site.
A surviving thangka painting from Potala Palace in Tibet, that was painted during the Thirteenth Dalai Lama inspired this exquisite thangka painting .This painting includes typical Eri style features of gorgeous pale blue skies, symmetrical compositions and wonderful decorative details such as the clouds and flowers. The coloring and shading of the clouds to give the distinctive feature of dark holes called “cloud-eyes” in the center is a highlight of Eri style painting tradition.


The sequence in this composition begins with Shakyamuni Buddha, who sits upon his enlightenment and lion-throne at the centre. Buddha Shakyamuni is depicted here seated on a white moon disc upon a peach colored lotus, supported by an ornately decorated throne which is carried on the backs of a pair of lions.

Shakyamuni Buddha’s color is like the color of the dawning sun,both pleasing to the eyes and appealing to the senses. He is dressed in the traditional three red robes meticulously decorated with minute flower designs, scattered all around the brilliantly presented folding fabric. All of these flower motifs have been created using 24-karat gold dust. Seated in Vajra-posture he rests his right hand upon his right knee in the “earth-touching” gesture. His left hand rests in his lap holding a blue alms-bowl filled with nectar. This too has been beautifully decorated with strings of pearl like garland design. The aureole (ava and prabha mandal ) around buddha’s head and body is decorated with fine gold linings against a backdrop of soothing blue and green hues. Three layers of motifs, further decorate the aura. Precious stones, artistic floral patterns and a rainbow has been used as the motif.


On either side of the throne are two symmetrical white Elephants covered with floral patterned brocades over their backs. Two blue Lions stand on top of the elephants with long flowing mane. Above the lions an unusual creature is seen. It is a combination of a head of a goat, the mane of a lion, the horns of a ram, a body of a horse and the feet of a lion . This amazing being is called a Sharabha and it represents the combined strength, perseverance and speed of all the creatures it embodies.
On the back of the Sharabha sit two handsome and youthful Devas wearing colorful fabrics and have their eyes gazing inwards. They hold over their heads neatly decorated crossbeams, which support the two makaras who have their heads upturned facing towards the two dragons lurking out of the clouds. At the end of their beautiful feathered makara tails two young naga serpents appear with radiant features adorned with golden ornaments and a regal crown. These two naga serpents have been gripped in the talons of the magnificent Garuda with its wings flaying and eyes bulging. He is also devouring on a long snake outstretched out of his beak. The serenity of the nagas faces somehow pacifies the daunting expression of the Garuda.

These Six creatures interestingly represent the Six paramitas or Six perfections of the Enlightened mind. The perfection of Generosity (Dana) is represented by Garuda, the perfection of Morality ( Shila ) by the Two Nagas, the perfection of Patience (Khyanti) by the two Makaras, the perfection of effort (Birya) by the two Devas, the perfection of concentration (Samadhi) by the two elephants and the perfection of wisdom (Pragya) by the two lions.
Sakyamuni Buddha descended to the world to show the right path to the fortunate beings, so that they may attain freedom from the cycle of existence. He practiced all kinds of Bodhisattva's activities to attain perfect enlightenment and traveled to deliver the religious sermons for the benefit of all sentient beings, till the end of his life.
The Prajñāpāramitā is the central teaching of Lord Buddha which contains two major virtues, prajñā (wisdom) and upāya (method). In this Sūtra, he depicts the different stages of the path to lead to Buddhahood which is the final goal of the sentient beings. It means that one must practice the wisdom and method together to attain enlightenment.
1. Shakyamuni (Tib. Shakya thub-pa), the 'Sage of the Shakyas' is the historical Buddha and the first of the Thirty-five Buddhas. He is golden-yellow in colour, his right hand makes the earth-touching gesture, and his left hand rests upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise as he supports his blue alms-bowl.

2. Vajragarbha-pramardin (Tib. rDo-rje snying-po rab-tu 'joms-pa), the 'Vajra Essence Conqueror', who appears directly to the left of the Buddha's lion-throne and Sariputra. He is dark blue in colour, and both of his hands are held before his heart with their palms facing outwards in the gesture of explaining the dharma.

3. Ratnarshis (Tib. Rin-chen 'od-'phro), the 'Jewel Radiating Light'. He is white in colour, and both of his hands rest upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

4. Nagesvara-raja (Tib. kLu-dbang-gi rgyal-po), the 'Lordly King of the Nagas'. His body is dark blue up to the lower crease of his neck, his neck and face are white, and seven naga-serpents appear around his halo. Both of his hands are folded before his heart with their index fingers extended in a gesture known as 'removing beings from places of birth in the miserable realms'.

5. Virasena (Tib. dPa'-bo'i-sde), the 'Hero of Warriors'. His body colour is yellow, and both hands are held in the abhaya-mudra of protection, with his right hand at the level of his knee, and his left hand in front of his heart.

6. Viranandin (Tib. dPa'-bo dgyes), the 'Joyful Hero'. His body is flesh coloured and both hands are held before his heart in the dharmachakra-mudra of teaching.

7. Ratnagni (Tib. Rin-chen-me), the 'Jewel of Fire', who appears directly above Shakyamuni's throne. He is red in colour and is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture, and his left hand resting upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

8. Ratnacandraprabha (Tib. Rin-chen zla-'od), the 'Jewel of Moonlight'. He is white in colour and is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture, and his left hand in the gesture of meditative equipoise.

9. Amoghadarsin (Tib. mT'on-ba don-yod), the 'Meaningful to Behold'. He is dark green in colour, and his two hands rest upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

10. Ratnacandra (Tib. Rin-chen zla-ba), the 'Jewel Moon'. He is pale green in colour, and both hands are held before his heart in the dharmachakra-mudra of teaching.

11. Vimala (Tib. Dri-ma med-pa), the 'Stainless One'. He is grey in colour, and both hands rest upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

12. Shuradatta (Tib. dPal-sbyin), the 'Courageous Giver', who appears directly to the right of the Buddha's lion-throne and Maudgalyayana. He is white in colour, and both hands are held before his heart in the teaching or dharmachakra-mudra.

13. Brahma (Tib. Tshangs-pa), the 'Supremely Pure One'. His body is flesh coloured, and he is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture, and his left hand in the gesture of meditative equipoise.

14. Brahmadatta (Tib. Tshangs-pas sbyin), the 'Giver of Purity'. He is yellow in colour, and both his hands are held before his heart in the dharmachakra-mudra of teaching.

15. Varuna (Tib. Chu-lha), the 'Water Deity'. He is dark blue in colour, and he is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture, and his left hand in the gesture of meditative equipoise.

16. Varunadeva (Tib. Chu-lha'i-lha), the 'God of all Water Deities', who appears at the top left. He is white in colour, and with both hands held before his heart he makes the dharmachakra-mudra of teaching.

17. Bhadrashri (Tib. dPal-bzang), the 'Gloriously Good', who appears at the top centre of all the Thirty-five Buddhas. He is pale red in colour, and his right hand is extended palm-downwards to his knee in the abhaya-mudra of protection, while his left hand rests upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

18. Candanashri (Tib. Tsan-dan dpal), the 'Glorious Sandalwood', who appears at the top right. He is yellow in colour, and his right hand is held palm-outwards in the abhaya-mudra of protection, while his left hand rests upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

19. Anantaujas (Tib. gZi-brjid mtha'-yas), the 'Infinite Splendor'. He is red in colour, and with both hands held before his heart he makes the gesture of explaining the dharma.

20. Prabhasashri (Tib. 'Od-dpal), the 'Glorious Light'. He is white in colour, and with both hands held before his heart he makes the gesture of explaining the dharma.

21. Ashokashri (Tib. Mya-ngan med-pa'i dpal), the 'Glorious One Without Sorrow'. He is light blue in colour, and with both hands resting upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise he holds a piece of 'lotus-jewel' rock that represents the 'Precious Lord of Mountains'.

22. Narayana (Tib. Sred-med-kyi bu), the 'Son Without Desire'. He appears at the top left of the third row from the bottom, with the remaining fourteen Buddhas appearing sequentially from left to right in these three lower rows. He is sky blue in colour, and with both hands held before his heart he makes the gesture of explaining the dharma.

23. Kusumashri (Tib. Me-tog dpal), the 'Glorious Flower'. He is yellow in colour, and with both hands he makes the abhaya-mudra of protection, with his right hand extended palm-downwards at his knee, and his left hand held before his heart.

24. Brahmajyotis (Tib. Tshans-pa'i 'od-zer), the 'Radiantly Pure Light', who appears directly below Shakyamuni's throne at the centre. He is white in colour and is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture and his left hand resting upon his lap in meditative equipoise.

25. Padmajyotis (Tib. Pad-ma'i 'od-zer), the 'Radiant Lotus Light'. He is red in colour and is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture and his left hand resting upon his lap in meditative equipoise.

26. Dhanashri (Tib. Nor-dpal), the 'Gloriously Abundant in Wealth'. He is pink in colour and appears at the top right of the third row from the bottom. With his right hand he makes the abhaya-mudra of protection in front of his heart, while his left hand rests upon his lap in meditative equipoise.

27. Smrtishri (Tib. Dran-pa'i-dpal), the 'Gloriously Mindful', who appears on the left of the second row from the bottom. He is yellow in colour, and is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture and his left hand resting upon his lap in meditative equipoise.

28. Suparikirtita-namadheyashri (Tib. mTshan-dpal shin-tu yongs-grags-pa), the 'Illustrious and Gloriously Named', who is green in colour. With his right hand he makes the abhaya-mudra of protection in front of his heart, and his left hand rests upon his lap in meditative equipoise.

29. Indraketu-dhvaja (Tib. dBan-po'i tog-gi rgyal-mtshan), the 'Mighty Holder of the Victory Banner'. He is yellow in colour, and his left hand rests upon his lap in dhyana-mudra. With his right hand he makes the abhaya-mudra of protection in front of his heart as he holds the shaft of his attribute, a silk victory-banner.

30. Suvikranta (Tib. Shin-tu rnam-par gnon-pa), the 'Victorious Subjugator'. He is white in colour, and his left hand rests upon his lap in dhyana-mudra. With his right hand he makes the abhaya-mudra of protection in front of his heart as he holds the vajra-handle of his attribute, a blazing iron sword.

31. Vijita-samgrama (Tib. gYul-las sin-tu rnam-pa rgyal-ba), the 'Victorious in Battle'. He is black in colour, and appears at the right of the second row from the bottom. With both hands in front of his heart he holds the attribute of a piece of armor.

32. Vikranta-gamin (Tib. rNam-par gnon-pa'i gsegs), the 'Victorious Subjugator'. He is white in colour, and appears in the bottom left corner. He is similar to Shakyamuni in appearance, with his right hand making the earth-touching gesture and his left hand resting upon his lap in dhyana-mudra.

33. Samantavabhasa-vyuha (Tib. Kun-nas snang-ba bkod-pa), the 'Eternally Illuminating One', who is yellow in colour. He makes the abhaya-mudra of protection with both hands, his right hand extended palm-downwards and his left hand held in front of his heart.

34. Ratnapadma-vikramin (Tib. Rin-chen pad-ma'i rnam-par gnon-pa), the 'Victorious Lotus Jewel'. He is red in colour, and both of his hands rest upon his lap in the dhyana-mudra of meditative equipoise.

35. Sailendra-raja (Tib. Ri-dbang-gi rgyal-po), the 'King of the Lord of Mountains', who appears in the bottom right corner. He is dark blue in colour, and with his right hand he makes the abhaya-mudra of protection in front of his heart, while his left hand rests upon his lap supporting a blue alms-bowl.
© text by Robert Beer and Ritual Thanka
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Amazed by their customer service and collection. Would definitely recommend them to everyone

Really Great Customer Service and very beautiful thangka collection.

This is a magnificent piece of Buddha Shakyamuni thangka. Masterfully executed in rich, vibrant colors with illuminating detail; The silk brocade frame compliments the painting beautifully and forms a focal point in our praying/meditation room I receive the piece earlier than expected in good shape; and prior to purchase, Rajendra was responding quickly and very helpful in providing high resolution picture for my further evaluation. Thank you Rajendra and surely I will be back again.

I was extremely pleased with the quality of the unique thangka I received, as well as the immaculate brocade. Communication with Ritual Thanka has been a pleasure, and shipping was faster than I could have hoped for. Six stars! :)

This is my second purchase - and it will not be my last. Service is fast and efficient. My first thanka came incredibly well packaged.

Absolutely beautiful! Such an intricate design. Painting arrived in perfect condition and pretty quickly considering its tour of the world! Thank you so much.

absolutely stunning piece of craftsmanship

Stunning quality. Perfect for our home shrine. Thank you.

Wife loved her birthday gift not in content and quality of the painting.

The Chenrezig thangka is a truly beautiful work of art. My expectations were exceeded. It will be a treasured work of art in my life and an inspiration for my practice. When I buy another thankga, I will definitely look at RitualThanka again. Thanks so much!